Maths – curriculum information

Intent:

At Stoneferry, Maths objectives are taken from the National Curriculum, and are structured into key areas of learning, which are consistent in each year group across the school. To do this we use the White Rose Hub from Year 1 – Year 6.

Mathematical knowledge, can be linked to engaging topics, but will be gained by the teaching of year group progressive skills, which build on previous learning, ensuring pupil’s learning becomes embedded. In addition to this, pupils will engage in enrichment activities to support their learning of Mathematics for a real purpose through Jigsaw and Cross-curricular lessons.

Implementation:

In Maths, progressive skills such as number bonds, times tables and the four operations are used to underpin the necessary knowledge of place value and number within year groups. Lesson objectives are structured and sequenced so that final outcomes are secure and meaningful. Children do not learn objectives in isolation but continue to embed these through carefully planned application of skills throughout the year.

All children have access to the Maths curriculum, as work is tailored appropriately for children with SEND. Children will learn through similar activities, with outcomes modified to suit all needs.

Impact:

Maths Impact is shown in:

  • KPI records
  • Progress records and data overviews
  • Evidence in books
  • Benchmarking against national tests and in school termly assessments
  • Weekly arithmetic test data
  • Pupil voice
  • Links to Staff Performance Management targets
  • Subject Action and School Development Plans and SSE cycle

In Maths, by the end of EYFS children will:

Developing a strong grounding in number so that all children develop the necessary building blocks to excel mathematically. Children should be able to count confidently, develop a deep understanding of the numbers to 10, the relationships between them and the patterns within those numbers. By providing frequent and varied opportunities to build and apply this understanding – such as using manipulatives, including small pebbles and tens frames for organising counting – children will develop a secure base of knowledge and vocabulary from which mastery of mathematics is built. In addition, the curriculum will include rich opportunities for children to develop their spatial reasoning skills across all areas of mathematics including shape, space and measures. Children will develop positive attitudes and interests in mathematics, look for patterns and relationships, spot connections, ‘have a go’, talk to adults and peers about what they notice and not be afraid to make mistakes.

By the end of Key Stage 1 children will:

Develop confidence and mental fluency with whole numbers, counting and place value. This should involve working with numerals, words and the four operations, including with practical resources [for example, concrete objects and measuring tools. Pupils should develop their ability to recognise, describe, draw, compare and sort different shapes and use the related vocabulary. They should also use a range of measures to describe and compare different quantities such as length, mass, capacity/volume, time and money. By the end of year 2, pupils should know the number bonds to 20 and be precise in using and understanding place value. An emphasis on practice at this early stage will aid fluency. Pupils should read and spell mathematical vocabulary, at a level consistent with their increasing word reading and spelling knowledge at key stage 1.

By the end of Lower Key Stage 2 children will:

Become increasingly fluent with whole numbers and the four operations, including number facts and the concept of place value. They will develop efficient written and mental methods and perform calculations accurately with increasingly large whole numbers. Pupils should develop their ability to solve a range of problems, including with simple fractions and decimal place value. Pupils will have the opportunity draw with increasing accuracy and develop mathematical reasoning so they can analyse shapes and their properties, and confidently describe the relationships between them. It should ensure that they can use measuring instruments with accuracy and make connections between measure and number. By the end of year 4, pupils should have memorised their multiplication tables up to and including the 12 multiplication table and show precision and fluency in their work. Pupils should read and spell mathematical vocabulary correctly and confidently, using their growing word reading knowledge and their knowledge of spelling.

By the end of Upper Key Stage 2 children will:

Extend their understanding of the number system and place value to include larger integers. This should develop the connections that pupils make between multiplication and division with fractions, decimals, percentages and ratio. Pupils should develop their ability to solve a wider range of problems, including increasingly complex properties of numbers and arithmetic, and problems demanding efficient written and mental methods of calculation. With this foundation in arithmetic, pupils are introduced to the language of algebra as a means for solving a variety of problems. Teaching in geometry and measures should consolidate and extend knowledge developed in number. Pupils will classify shapes with increasingly complex geometric properties and that they learn the vocabulary they need to describe them. By the end of year 6, pupils should be fluent in written methods for all four operations, including long multiplication and division, and in working with fractions, decimals and percentages. Pupils should read, spell and pronounce mathematical vocabulary correctly.

Support at home:

*Every child has a Times Table Rock Stars login, this is used and children can access this at home and school to support number fluency.

*Regular homework

*Maths newsletters

*Access to the Calculation Policy with guidance understanding year group specific strategies

Further information:

What is the best thing you have done in school?
“The best thing I’ve done at school was going to William’s Den and building my own den.”

Pupil Voice

What is your favourite subject and why? –
“Maths because I love numbers and adding.”

Pupil Voice

What do you like about the teachers?
“They tell jokes and help us learn.”

Pupil Voice

What is your favourite subject and why?
“English because I love writing stories and poems.”

Pupil Voice

What is your favourite subject and why?
“Art because it calms me down and it’s great fun.”

Pupil Voice

What is the best thing you have done in school?
“I enjoy the school trips to the museum so I can learn.”

Pupil Voice

What would you say to a child who is worried about joining this school?
“Be yourself. It’s a great school and you’ll fit in.”

Pupil Voice

What is the best thing you have done in school?
“Everything. I enjoy every single second of school.”

Pupil Voice

What do you like about the teachers?
“They make me feel safe.”

Pupil Voice

What is the best thing you have done in school?
“I really enjoy playing for the school football team.”

Pupil Voice

What would you say to a child who is worried about joining this school?
“Stoneferry is a friendly school.”

Pupil Voice

What would you say to a child who is worried about joining this school?
“We will look after you and help you.”

Pupil Voice

What is the best thing you have done in school?
“I love the school trips and when we go to the church to sing.”

Pupil Voice

What is your favourite subject and why?
“Art because I like drawing and sometimes my work goes on the wall.”

Pupil Voice

What is your favourite subject and why?
“Topic and Art are my favourite lessons because they push me to my limits and are fun.”

Pupil Voice

What is your favourite subject and why? –
“I love P.E. because I am a real sports person and enjoy being creative.”

Pupil Voice

What do you like about the teachers?
“They are helpful and kind.”

Pupil Voice